Skip to main content

Importance of Proper Eye Care

Vision Exams For Adults

21st-century lifestyles demand more from our vision than ever before. The American Optometric Association recommends a yearly eye exam for adults – not only to detect and to diagnose vision changes or problems – but, also to maintain eye health. For example, glaucoma, a disease caused by increased pressure in the eye, commonly goes unnoticed by adults including cataracts or even age-related macular degeneration. Regular vision examinations are also important for the prevention of vision problems created or aggravated by today’s academic and professional demands.

Vision Exams For Children

Children with uncorrected vision conditions or eye health problems face many barriers in life such as academically, socially, and athletically. High-quality eye care can break down these barriers and help enable your children to reach their highest potential. Vision doesn’t just happen. A child’s brain learns how to use their eyes to see, just like the brain learns how to use their legs to walk or the mouth to form words. Eighty percent of all we learn is through our vision. The longer a vision problem goes undiagnosed and untreated, the more a child’s brain learns to accommodate to the vision issues. That’s why it is very important for a child to have a comprehensive eye examination annually. Early detection and treatment provide the very best opportunity to correct vision issues, so a child can learn to see clearly. Make sure your child has the best possible tools to learn successfully.

Routine eye exams are important- regardless of your age or your physical health.

During a comprehensive eye exam, your eye doctor does much more than just determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses. He or she will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health. Eye doctors often are the first health care professionals to detect chronic systemic diseases such as high blood pressure and diabetes.

The Eye Library

How The Eye Works

Our ability to “see” starts when light reflects off an object at which we are looking and enters the eye. As it enters the eye, the light is unfocused. The first step in seeing is to focus the light rays onto the retina, which is the light-sensitive layer found inside the eye. Once the light is focused, it stimulates cells to send millions of electrochemical impulses along the optic nerve to the brain. The portion of the brain at the back of the head interprets the impulses, enabling us to see the object.

Light, Refraction, And It’s Importance.

Light entering the eye is first bent, or refracted, by the cornea — the clear window on the outer front surface of the eyeball. The cornea provides most of the eye’s optical power or light-bending ability. After the light passes through the cornea, it is bent again — to more finely adjusted focus — by the crystalline lens inside the eye. The lens focuses the light on the retina. This is achieved by the ciliary muscles in the eye changing the shape of the lens, bending or flattening it to focus the light rays on the retina.

This adjustment in the lens, know as accommodation, is necessary for bringing near and far objects into focus. The process of bending light to produce a focused image on the retina is called “refraction”. Ideally, the light is “refracted”, or redirected, in such a manner that the rays are focused into a precise image on the retina.

Most vision problems occur because of an error in how our eyes refract light. In nearsightedness (myopia), the light rays from an image in front of the retina. In farsightedness (hypermetropia), the rays focus behind the retina. In astigmatism, the curvature of the cornea is irregular, causing light rays to focus more than one place so that a single clear image cannot be formed on the retina, resulting in blurred vision. As we age, we find reading or performing close-up activities more difficult. This condition is call presbyopia, and results from the crystalline lens being less flexible, and therefore less able to bend light.

 

Last updated: 4/18/2017