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Monkeypox Information

Georgia Southern Health Services is committed to providing the highest level of care to our university community. In response to the current United States’ monkeypox outbreak, our healthcare providers have been trained in identifying monkeypox and our staff has committed to strengthening infection prevention strategies to create a safe and healthy environment across our campuses.

  • If you have symptoms of monkeypox or are concerned that you may have been exposed, please schedule an appointment with your Health Services provider.
  • For questions and support for individuals who have tested positive, please contact the Dean of Students office at deanofstudents@georgiasouthern.edu.
  • If you have symptoms of monkeypox or are concerned that you may have been exposed, please schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider.
  • For questions and support for individuals who have tested positive, please contact Human Resources by submitting a MyHelp ticket.

2022 Monkeypox Outbreak

On May 17, 2022, the United States confirmed the first monkeypox case in Massachusetts. Since then, several thousand additional cases have been identified throughout the United States.

Click here for 2022 U.S. Case Counts and Trends.

Transmission

The monkeypox virus is spreading mostly through close, intimate contact with someone who has monkeypox. You can take steps to prevent getting monkeypox and lower your risk during sex. People can spread monkeypox from the time symptoms tart until all symptoms have resolved, up to two to four weeks.

For additional information, click here.

Symptoms

People with monkeypox get a rash that may be located on or near the genitals or anus, and could be on other areas like the hands, feet, chest, face, or mouth. Other symptoms can include fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, body aches, headache, and respiratory symptoms, like a cough, sore throat, or nasal congestion.

If you have any symptoms of monkeypox, talk to your healthcare provider, even if you don’t think that you had contact with someone who has monkeypox.

For additional information, click here.

Testing

If you are a student, visit our Eagle Online Student Health Patient Portal on MyGeorgiaSouthern to schedule an appointment if you are concerned that you might have monkeypox.

If you are faculty or staff, monkeypox testing is available throughout Georgia. Contact your local health department for more information on how to obtain a test.

Vaccination

CDC recommends vaccinations for people who have been exposed to monkeypox and people who are at higher risk of being exposed to monkeypox. Vaccination is being managed by the Georgia Department of Public Health. However, please note that the current demand for monkeypox vaccination exceeds the available supply of vaccine.

Click below for vaccination appointment scheduling with the Georgia Department of Public Health.

Frequently Asked Questions

What do I do if I test positive for monkeypox?

CDC recommends that people with monkeypox remain isolated at home or another location for the duration of illness.

If you test positive for monkeypox, you should isolate until the rash has fully resolved, the scabs have fallen off, and a fresh layer of intact skin has formed. This can take up to two to four weeks in most cases.

Click here for isolation guidance from the Georgia Department of Public Health.

What do I do if I think that I have been exposed to monkeypox?

Close contacts to individuals with symptoms of monkeypox should monitor for symptoms for 21 days after their last known exposure. At this time, quarantine is not recommended.

Exposed individuals may qualify for post-exposure vaccination. Additional information about vaccination is provided above.

When should I get tested for monkeypox?

People who think they have monkeypox or have had close personal contact with someone who has monkeypox should visit a healthcare provider to help them decide if they need to be tested for monkeypox. If they decide that you should be tested, they will work with you to collect the specimens and send them to a laboratory for testing.

How can monkeypox be prevented?

  • Speak with your healthcare provider if you think that you have been exposed to monkeypox or if you develop a rash that might be monkeypox.
  • Stay away from others, covers all of the lesions on your body, and wear a mask until you are evaluated by a healthcare provider.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face and after you use the bathroom.
  • Avoid direct, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox.
  • Avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used (i.e., bedding, clothing, towels).

Learn more about preventing monkeypox.

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Posted in Health Alerts, Public Health Updates